This 2022 BMW M240i Is A Purple Pocket Rocket

An updated sports coupe gets plenty of improvements.

Proper M models from BMW are legit contenders in their respective classes, and to capitalize on this, the Munich marque was smart to slap a lighter version of that celebrated letter on several of its models. When the 2 Series got this treatment nearly a decade ago, the M235i was instantly hot. A bargain version of the iconic brand, offering some stellar performance for your enthusiast dollar. Sure, having more numbers after the M meant it wasn’t quite the hot model in the lineup, but BMW hit a sweet spot.

For 2022, the 2 Series coupe got an upgrade in both sheetmetal and powertrain, but the styling is going a different direction than its truly polarizing 3 and 4 Series siblings, while still testing the patience of BMW loyalists with its looks. Thankfully the exterior lines aren’t too edgy, and the numbers on paper catch the eye, but is this new 2 Series a true sportscar player at a price that’s easier to stomach?

The Important Figures

Under the 2022 BMW M240i’s hood is the B58, a twin-scroll turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six–also found in the BMW M340i sedan–which cranks out a healthy 382 horsepower and 369 lb-ft of torque. A ZF 8-speed automatic is the only transmission (clutch your pearls, manual fans), and BMW’s xDrive all-wheel-drive is the default driveline too. With this powertrain, the M240i will sprint from 0-60 MPH in just 4.1 seconds, on its way to a 130 MPH top speed on all-season run flat tires (or 155 when fitted with optional summer performance tires).

BMW adjusted the 2 Series coupe’s dimensions for 2022, now sporting a 62.2-inch front and 62.8-inch rear track, which is nearly identical to the faster M2. A 2-inch longer wheelbase now measures 107.9 inches, and the weight distribution is 53.1/46.9 front to rear. The entry level 230i coupe is standard with rear-wheel-drive, and this quicker M240i comes with BMW’s xDrive setup that spins all four wheels. Due to possessing all-wheel-drive, the M240i conceals a bit more weight than the proper M2, tipping the scales at 3,871 pounds.

Because of its compact coupe size, the power it packs, and the price point, the 2022 BMW M240i has a mixed group of competitors. Cross shoppers could consider a Toyota Supra, Porsche 718 Cayman, or Audi S3, depending on which of those categories tickles their fancy most effectively. At a base price of $48,560, the BMW M240i catches plenty of enthusiasts’ attention. After ticking a few options boxes, and adding a stunning shade of Thundernight Metallic paint, this tester hit a total MSRP of $56,845.

A Compliant Cruiser

BMW is nailing the civility challenges some sports cars can’t overcome. The M240i is a fantastic daily driver, benefitting from the adaptive dampers from the last generation 2 Series’ M2 CS–that I called the best driver’s car BMW has ever produced–that provide a sublime city driving experience. Surprisingly, the M240i doesn’t feel as heavy as it truly is, and the adaptive suspension is the primary reason. There’s good responsiveness from the M240i’s suspension, but the tech softens any chassis harshness one would expect from a sporty coupe.

Electric assistance makes the M240i’s steering feel light yet sharp in its comfort and eco modes, and only gets properly heavy when put into the individual or sport modes. Now boasting all-wheel-drive, the BMW M240i offers greater confidence when the weather is less than favorable. In standard trim, the M240i comes with a square setup of 19-inch wheels wrapped in 225/40/19 all-season rubber, but this tester was fitted with M Sport 19-inch wheels with meatier 245/35/19 front and 255/35/19 rear Pirelli P Zero summer tires for added grip.

The turbocharged engine concealed beneath the M240i’s sculpted hood is a gem, offering plenty of smooth torque that helps it scoot past slower commuters effortlessly. While there’s sufficient power ready to consume lots of premium unleaded, BMW does have an eco drive mode to tame the throttle response and mapping, making the EPA fuel economy estimates of 23/32/26 more attainable. I like that each of the eco, comfort, and sport drive modes in the M240i can have individual configurations, giving the driver greater flexibility for dialing in the perfect setup for any driving mood. My errand running setup was in the eco pro mode, but I made the steering tighten up, and kept the suspension in comfort.

Once you slip into the driver’s seat, the M240i’s cockpit looks identical to that in the bigger brother BMW 4 Series, down to the thick-rimmed multifunction steering wheel. Even the console for the shifter, drive modes, and iDrive puck look like they were plucked from the upper segment BMW model. Similar to the 4 Series is the M240i’s infotainment and climate control cluster, which neatly includes easy to use controls.

A tasteful update over last year’s 2 Series, the materials in the 2022 BMW M240i definitely aren’t entry level, giving it an advantage over its rivals. For an extra $150, BMW gave this M240i cool aluminum tetragon trim too. Seats are big and plush, with good headroom and shoulder width up front. Legroom in the back seat isn’t great, but this is a compact coupe, so as long as your adult friends aren’t stuck back there for anything longer than a quick run to get a bite to eat they’ll live. Trunk space is plentiful in the M240i too, and if you need even more storage, the rear seats fold flat.

BMW’s adaptive cruise control is great, which I tested thoroughly on a couple Austin-area toll roads, but it’s part of the $1,450 driver assistance package that also includes extra parking assistance, a drive recorder, and a 3D surround view on the infotainment display. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard in the M240i’s infotainment system, with a wireless mobile charging pad installed in the compartment which also conceals the cupholders. I suggest spending an extra $875 to upgrade to the Harman Kardon audio system, which sounds fantastic.

A Proper Back Road Plaything

It may not be a full-fat BMW M model, but don’t sleep on the M240i. Possessing under 400 horsepower doesn’t make big headlines in the sports car world, but don’t scoff at the M240i’s 382 peak horsepower output. The straight-six is pleasantly punchy, offering its peak 369 lb-ft of torque across a massive plateau from 1,800 – 5,000 RPM, allowing this purple machine to scream with ease. Could this enthusiast driver be happier with more power? Sure, but frankly the M240i’s power is more than sufficient. Exhaust notes from the M240i aren’t the most striking, but this M-lite model is supposed to be more composed than its proper M siblings, even if it’s apparent there are fake engine sounds being pumped through the speakers.

BMW’s choice to fit all-wheel-drive may have added weight over the front axle, but that is a compromise I’ll happily make because the upgrade certainly improves front-end stability when tossing the M240i into fast sweepers. If you’re really pissed about BMW having all-wheel-drive, you’ll be happy to know that the M240i will have a rear-wheel-drive option later this year. I expected a bit more understeer with all-wheel-drive, versus rear-drive 2 Series models I’ve tested in the past, but the M240i still likes to slide its ass-end, thanks to a bit of rear-wheel bias. The standard M Sport rear differential effectively manages slip angle too, making it exit any corner smoothly even if you’re heavy on the throttle.

My sport individual setup put the engine and transmission in sport plus, steering in sport (because sport plus just seemed a little too heavy and sensitive), but like every other grumpy 40-something reviewer I stuck the dampers in comfort. Unless you’re on the smoothest track, keep the suspension in its soft mode, particularly as the adaptive suspension will perfectly compensate for any bumps while providing the perfect amount of firmness faster than your synapses fire.

BMW says this new M240i has more negative camber than the last generation, helping the Pirelli contact patch stick where it’s supposed to in the corners. I still don’t love the P Zero, and will continue to crave the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S as the all-around rubber champ until something better comes along, but the Pirellis held up quite well when I gave the M240i a good thrashing session along a twisty road just outside of Austin. The bright blue calipers clamping on steel rotors didn’t get too hot during fun sessions either, and the pedal feedback was bang-on.

The M240i’s revised front end sports new kidney grilles–which thankfully aren’t massive like the M3 and M4–that incorporate air flap control to reduce drag when the engine is running at optimal temperatures while sliding open when additional cooling is required. Out back, the M240i gets a neatly integrated rear lip spoiler. While crafting a new body design, BMW claims it reduced the M240i’s lift by 50% thanks to optimized aerodynamics.

The Pros And Cons

Thank you, BMW, for offering the M240i with this wildly cool paint as the launch color. Thundernight Metallic isn’t just a cool name, but the deep purple shade has a great amount of metallic flake mixed in to create a stunning look when any dose of sunlight hits it. Reshaping the new M240i was an overdue task, and this finished product has mixed results. Overall, the look is good, and the more pronounced fender flares give this compact sports coupe a more muscular stance, but BMW didn’t get the fascia right. The new kidney grilles are cool and functional, but I don’t understand why the angled side vents are so big and sharp. Then there’s the tail end. Much like the front, the lines seem too edgy, and slightly cheapen the look of this upmarket sports car.

Details around the M240i have some positives. I like the new adaptive LED headlight housings, which have circular lighting projectors within the sharper housings. The texture worked into the daytime running light element is futuristic too. Gray metallic caps are used over the side view mirrors, offering a hint more contrast to this compact BMW’s body, and the shadow line trim around the bumpers and grilles is a nice feature. The M240i’s seats are comfortable to spend hours in, and subtle in appearance, as opposed to the ones fitted to the M3 and M4. I also like the blue contrasting stitching that completes a sporty look.

There are a couple points deducted in the cockpit. I am not a fan of the gauge cluster. It is now a fully digital display that can be customized, but the needles for the tachometer and speedometer are tiny, and the numbers all blend together too easily. Nothing about them truly stands out to make a needle nor number clearly visible. Drive modes have individual buttons, so you have to take your eyes off the road to make sure you’re pressing the correct one. I wish there was a knob for this function, like there are in other German sports cars.

The climate control system doesn’t have a sync button on the dash, so if you want to align all the ventilation, you have to tap the A/C menu button and make a couple extra adjustments on the infotainment screen. Buttons are also less than intuitive on the steering wheel, with the roller used to change menus on the gauge pod, rather than adjusting volume. Instead that’s done with the + / – buttons. Those last two items are small complaints though.

A Great Little Sports Coupe

BMW gave the M240i a great stack of updates for 2022. Its power is plentiful, the steering is precise, and the handling is fantastic. The new M240i’s exterior appearance may not be as tidy as its predecessor’s, but the refreshed body is more stylish without being as polarizing as the M3 or M4. The M240i may not offer flashy stats like its bigger M siblings, but there’s more than enough performance to satisfy this enthusiast. I won’t deny that I look forward to reviewing the next iteration of the M2 and its faster variants, but this lesser M model still ticks plenty of boxes.

When I evaluate the M240i’s capabilities, its compact packaging, and its sub-$60,000 price, I compare it to BMW’s E46 M3. Still one of my favorite performance cars from the early 2000s, it offered stellar performance at the right price, with proportions that nailed it for me. When viewed in that light, the M240i is a modern interpretation of that iconic analog driving gem, ready to put a massive grin on your face as you conquer a twisty road, and I think that makes it a big hit.

THE MERCEDES-BENZ S580 RAISES THE EXECUTIVE SEDAN BAR AGAIN

Boasting supreme luxury and cool styling, this loaded flagship sedan leads the field.

When Mercedes-Benz launches a new S-Class, the industry takes note. Always the pinnacle of the German marque’s capabilities, the S-Class brings new tech, features, and styling cues to the lineup, and makes the competition step up its game. Recognized as the sedan that hauls bank executives, dignitaries, and celebrities alike, this Mercedes-Benz icon has serious expectations to conquer.

Competing with the BMW 7 Series, Audi A8, and Maserati Quattroporte, the S-Class will always have rivals at its heels. In its newest form, Mercedes has unveiled its executive sedan to suit the driver as much as the driven occupant. Having reviewed a variety of ultimate luxury sedans including the Rolls-Royce Ghost and Bentley Flying Spur, I wanted to see how a slightly more attainable luxury sedan got along, so I gave it a comprehensive test.

THE KEY SPECIFICATIONS

Mercedes-Benz offers the new S-Class with two different engine options. In the S500, a turbocharged 3.0-liter straight-six (shared with the AMG GT 53 I reviewed) makes its way under the hood, coupled with Mercedes’ EQ Boost 48V mild-hybrid system, producing 429 horsepower and 384 lb-ft of torque. In S580 guise, Mercedes provides its exceptional 4.0-liter biturbo V8, also equips its EQ Boost system, which bumps the output to 496 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque. The S580 is driven by a 9-speed automatic that powers all four wheels, and the sprint from 0-60 MPH takes only 4.4 seconds.

At 208 inches long, 77 wide, and 59 tall, the S-Class has a 65-inch front and 66-inch wide rear track, and a wheelbase measuring 126 inches. In its ultimately appointed–and more expensive–Maybach offering, Mercedes extends the wheelbase and overall length seven inches, providing the rear cabin occupants a massive space to be driven in. Thanks to extensive use of aluminum in its construction, this luxobarge tips the scales at just 4,775 pounds.

Mercedes offers the S580 in three distinct trim levels, with the Luxury Line being its standard model, at a base price of $117,700. The upper trim is the Executive Line model, which adds seating and entertainment upgrades to the rear cabin, focused on the driven occupant. The model I tested is the AMG Line, in the middle of the lineup, adding sportier details inside and out, with a base price of $122,000.

Painted Obsidian Black, treated with Sienna Brown and Black Exclusive Nappa leather, and trimmed with Slate high-gloss poplar wood trim, my tester added 22-inch AMG wheels with performance tires, rear-axle steering, the Burmester 4D high-end audio system, warmth and comfort package, night package, and 3D technology package to hit a total MSRP of $142,090.

THE BEST WAY TO COMMUTE TO THE OFFICE

As expected from a car of this caliber, the all-new Mercedes S580 is wonderful to spend time cruising in. While the standard inline-six in the S500 is a good powerplant, the biturbo V8 stuffed into the S580 is the one you want. With its peak 516 lb-ft of torque available from 2,000 – 4,000 RPM, there’s no hesitation when you want the S-Class to surge ahead, complimented by the smoothest torque-ll provided by Mercedes’ EQ Boost mild-hybrid system. Unfortunately Mercedes no longer has a 12-cylinder option in the S-Class, like is standard in the Rolls-Royce Ghost I enjoyed, and is optional in the Bentley Flying Spur and BMW 7 Series.

The S-Class glides over the bumpiest city streets, thanks to its adaptive AIRMATIC suspension that prevents any disruptions inside this massive chassis. Despite being a huge executive sedan, the S580 is remarkably nimble, and the rear-axle steering is a great option box to tick for added agility. Pirelli P zero rubber is wrapped around the 22-inch wheels in the AMG Line, which denitely help it cope in the bends. I took this S-Class along twisty roads on multiple occasions, and was more than pleased with how confidently it carved corners.

The dynamic drive modes offer eco, comfort, sport, and sport plus defaults, and my favorite individual setup involved putting the engine in comfort, the suspension in sport, and the steering in sport too. I liked a hint firmer response–but not too stiff–from the adaptive dampers, as the comfort mode was more floaty than I prefer. Demand even more cornering prowess? Drop $6,500 on the E-Active Body Control that employs a stereo camera system that works in harmony with the 48V electronics in the suspension to minimize body roll, pitch, and dive characteristics under any driving condition. Even if that drive is only made between one’s massive house and the office or country club.

The new S-Class is treated to a cabin that’s upholding the new Mercedes look that perfectly balances cool and luxurious. The S580’s seats are supremely good, with loads of support in the right spots, and heating, ventilation, and massage modes that will spoil you along any drive. The pillows attached to the headrests are a nice touch too. I suggest taking a long road trip to truly exploit the comfort provided in this flagship Mercedes.

The Burmester 3D surround audio system (a $6,730 option) is among the best I’ve heard in any car, even versus the Naim for Bentley system in the Flying Spur and the Bespoke Audio in the Rolls-Royce Ghost I reviewed, detailed with cool metallic speaker grilles (featuring tweeters that unscrew outward when the system is on). If the speakers aren’t potent enough, Mercedes supplies laminated glass that’s heat and noise-insulating, and IR-reflecting, to make sure you aren’t affected by any outside elements.

BEING DRIVEN IN COOL LUXURY

While driving the new Mercedes S580 is great, spending time in the back seat is fantastic. Even without opting for the Maybach model that boasts an extra seven inches of wheelbase that benefits the rear cabin, the legroom rear passengers will enjoy in the S-Class is massive. The optional warmth and comfort package adds rapid heating, cool ventilation, and power adjustments to the rear seats, while also giving the front passengers added heating in the center and door armrests.

If you’re the person being driven more often than driving, spend the extra cash for the Executive Line S580 that enhances the seating setup with massaging modes, a footrest on the right side, four-zone climate control, and upgrades to the MBUX infotainment system to allow for easier controls while utilizing a tablet that docks in the cooler center armrest that also conceals a wireless charging pad.

THE EXCEPTIONAL DETAILS

While the Mercedes-Benz S580’s exterior may project that it’s an understated executive sedan, but there are countless details that make it cool. The sculpted panels carry subtle styling lines that flow smoothly around its body, cleanly connecting the headlights to the taillights. The classic grille contains the cruise control radar components, and there’s still the iconic Mercedes-Benz hood ornament installed.

Under its fine sheetmetal, Mercedes-Benz has gone wild appointing its interior with some of the coolest tech you’ll spot inside any car currently on sale. An additional $3,000 will upgrade the cockpit with an augmented reality heads-up display and a 3D instrument cluster. The 64-color ambient light modes can be adjusted as desired, but I went for the cool Miami Sunset theme that cycles through retro pastel shades.

While cool speakers, ambient lights, and space age materials aren’t new to luxury cars, Mercedes has a party trick few can match, tucked into its infotainment’s settings: “Energizing Comfort” modes. Whether the S580’s occupants are in need of a boost of energy, want to calm themselves after a long day, or have just taken a dose of their favorite psychedelics (please don’t do this and drive), the S-Class will set up a mind-blowing experience.

Depending on the mode selected, an adaptive color theme is introduced through the ambient lights, the seat and armrest heaters crank up if it’s a warming theme or the seat ventilation fans activate, a unique massage mode begins, and the Burmester audio system flexes its prowess as instrumentals blast through all its numerous speakers. It’s an immersive experience like nothing else, and I strongly recommend making friends with a new S-Class owner, wandering to an open space at night, and firing up one of these modes.

THE POSITIVE POINTS

As more luxury manufacturers are making bold styling changes, Mercedes insists on keeping the S-Class refined. Every panel has the tiniest gap that is perfectly measured around the entire body. Soft-close doors silently operate, yet still have a solidly-weighted feel. Door handles are similar to those found on a Tesla Model S, but with smooth and silent extending and concealment when entering or exiting the S-Class.

I expected the new S-Class to be extremely well-assembled inside, but this S580 is exquisite. A blend of big high-resolution displays for the instrument cluster and MBUX infotainment system, fine quilted leather, and cool metal trim that compliments large wood panels complete a cabin I adore. Follow any stitching, wood, or metal trim line, and you’ll never spot a deviation or imperfection. Considering the S580 costs half the price of the Bentley Flying Spur and a third of the cost of a Rolls-Royce Ghost, the interior detailing of the S-Class is on-par with them both.

A FEW TINY COMPLAINTS

Where the complete outer proportions of the Mercedes S-Class are great, the front grille is a little large when presented between the smaller headlamp housings. I get that Mercedes wanted the front-end to be striking, but the main grille element needs to shrink about 20 percent. This is about as much of a complaint as I can find around the S580’s body, as it still looks ridiculously good.

Continuing the trend throughout its updated cabin designs, Mercedes has incorporated more capacitive touch controls for the seat adjustments, and I would prefer some physical movement that’s given more of a positive click when making each of the many seat sections move. The same gripe extends to the steering wheel setup that I didn’t love in the Mercedes E350 I drove not long ago. With physical controls being eliminated, Mercedes makes you take your eyes off the road to adjust the climate control or volume of your favorite music. At least the volume slider adjusts intuitively when you slide your finger either direction.

“THE BEST OR NOTHING” EPITOMIZED

More than a catchy tagline, the principle of “The Best or Nothing” is effectively applied to the new Mercedes S-Class. As is the case each time Mercedes-Benz releases a new S-Class, the luxury flagship benchmark has been reset with this newest edition. Best of luck to the S-Class’ rivals, in an attempt to compete with what is the best offering in its class by far. The S580 demonstrates the finest engineering and craftsmanship Mercedes can produce.

Met with timeless looks outside, the S580’s cabin is treated to wonderfully modern styling touches and a cool factor like no other flagship sedan. Pair a refined chassis with a mild-hybrid powertrain that creates a truly smooth surge, and the Mercedes-Benz S580 is as joyful behind the wheel as it is from the back seat. There’s nothing like a Mercedes-Benz S-Class, and I think it is absolutely the executive sedan to buy.